South Australia releases Hydrogen Roadmap

Hydrogen Car

The South Australian Government has released a Hydrogen Roadmap designed to accelerate investment in hydrogen infrastructure and technologies.

The roadmap outlines how the state’s renewable assets can attract international investment in hydrogen production and accelerate a transition to a zero carbon economy.

State Energy Minister Tom Koutsantonis said hydrogen offers an opportunity to create a new industry in South Australia.

“By developing this technology in South Australia, motorists will have new choices in electric and hydrogen-powered vehicles as well as the infrastructure needed to support those options,” he said.

“Our Hydrogen Roadmap aims to have South Australia at the forefront of hydrogen development in this region within the next decade.

“Within two years, commuters in Adelaide will be able to ride on the first of a fleet of hydrogen-powered buses using locally-produced fuel.

“Within three years, South Australia will have the capacity to export its first hydrogen supplies produced using our renewable energy assets.

“Within a decade South Australian motorists should be able to drive from Ceduna to Mt Gambier in a hydrogen-fuelled vehicle topping up at a state-wide network of refuelling stations.”

Developed in consultation with industry, the roadmap will help drive local demand for hydrogen in the transport and energy sectors, target overseas export markets, and establish South Australia as a testbed for cutting-edge hydrogen technology.

To coincide with the release of the report, the South Australian Government has called for hydrogen infrastructure proposals under the $150 million Renewable Technology Fund, as well as tenders to supply at least six hydrogen cell buses for the Adelaide Metro fleet along with supporting production and refuelling infrastructure

Seimens Australia and NZ chairman and CEO Jeff Connolly said South Australia’s abundant renewable resources and renewable targets lends itself to hydrogen solutions.

“The beauty of hydrogen is that it can be made using excess energy capacity driven by renewables and then used in a vast range of business applications,” he said.

“The role of hydrogen as an energy vector is gaining a lot of interest globally with the advent of cheaper renewables.

“If Australia can find a way to export renewable energy then we can build on our coal and gas export businesses and maintain our role well into the future as a regional energy export superpower.”

Energy Networks Australia interim CEO Andrew Dillon said the roadmap would support efforts to capture the benefits of this carbon-free fuel.

“The South Australian Government’s Hydrogen Roadmap aims to accelerate local demand for hydrogen as a fuel for transport, energy and industry,” Mr Dillon said.

“Hydrogen is one of the transformational technologies included in the Gas Vision 2050, which demonstrates how gas can continue to provide Australians with reliable and affordable energy into the future.”